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Not since the Gilded Age has our politics been opened so wide to corporate contributions and donations from secret sources. And the new era of big money has just begun. Jim Bopp, its intellectual architect, believes this is a good thing—the more money, the better, he says.

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Reformers and most voters disagree. Their battle is over the most-basic ideas of our democracy; at stake—according to both sides—is either the revitalization of politics, or its final capture by the powerful. You may be one of those people who believe there is too much money in politics. You may believe that the larger the financial contribution, the greater the chance it will corrupt your representative in Congress, or even your president.

You may believe that there are too many political advertisements on television, too many groups with blandly patriotic names trying to change your mind about energy or Medicare or national defense. It is reasonable—it is quite respectable—to believe these things. What Jim Bopp Jr. Where others saw reasonable limits on politicking, he saw shocking suppression of freedom of speech, whether the stage was as big as a presidential campaign or as small as a student-council race at the University of California at Irvine.

At the highest court in the land, standing in that deep well, with his wife and three daughters watching him, Bopp has gone four for six so far, knocking down laws and regulations that restrained money from entering politics.

Federal Election Commissionthe campaign-finance case he brought to the U. To have any chance of competing with the super pac s, they will abolish, or at least drastically raise, all contribution limits, to whichever candidate, from whatever source.

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And then the money will really start to pour in. Campaign finance is a deeply boring subject, so eye-glazing that one might almost suspect a conspiracy to make it that way, considering its centrality to how the country is governed. The ways we pay for politics are defined by a series of interlocking mazes—of congressional statutes and federal regulations, court cases and state laws.

But those mazes are built on top Casino Political Action Committee Ap Government Textbook some of the most basic ideas about the nature of the republic, about the right of free speech, the sources of power and corruption, and the relationships of citizens to the state and to one another.

That foundation is shifting now, to a degree not seen since Watergate, and perhaps not in more than a century, with effects that even the most-experienced politicians are just coming to appreciate. Not since the Gilded Age has our politics been opened so wide to corporate money and donations from secret sources. As Bopp argues, this new era has barely begun, and already, in this election season, we are experiencing a step change. We are quickly becoming accustomed to this new magnitude of giving.

Individuals, unlike corporations and unions, have always been free to spend as much as they want on politics, as long as they are acting independently of a formal campaign or political party. Super pac s are thriving, but they already seem almost old-fashioned. In August, an investigation by ProPublica found that two such groups had put more money into the presidential campaign than all the super pac s combined—though the super pac s themselves had spent more than the political parties.

InCongress established a public financing system for presidential elections, providing Casino Political Action Committee Ap Government Textbook amounts for the major-party nominees, as long as they agreed not to raise money from private donors for their own campaign though they could, and did, raise private money for a political party.

Barack Obama, inwas the first presidential candidate to reject this public funding. This year, both candidates opted out, and they have been putting a great deal of time into asking for money. In July, they both held more private events for donors than public events for potential voters.

Doherty, of the United States Naval Academy. In the same period, Ronald Reagan held three fund-raisers. The more money that is spent, the more individualized messages will be able to be funded. Potter is also a midwesterner from neighboring Illinois and a Republican; like Bopp, Potter got his earliest political experience volunteering for Barry Goldwater. But his own love of constitutional law, study of the Founders, and adventures in Republican politics sent him down a very different intellectual path.

Potter was one of the leading lawyers behind the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act ofknown as McCain-Feingold, the most significant campaign-finance law in 30 years. An outrage to one man is a reform to the other; a cesspool of corruption to one is a font of democracy to his antagonist; what to one is a clear-as-day rationale is to the other a deep, twisting rabbit hole.

Bopp is the campaign-finance lawyer to right-wing causes and candidates; Potter is the campaign-finance lawyer to that right-winger-in-a-fun-house-mirror, Stephen Colbert, who has done a series of segments in which he has set up and deployed his own secretive campaign funds. Both lawyers are such effective advocates for their respective views that traveling between Boppworld and Potterworld can be a dizzying experience.

You can find yourself wondering sometimes which man is the crusader for truth, justice, and the American way, and which is the bizarro version.

Given that such basic ideas about the sources of American democracy are in flux—that two such considered men can take such diametrically opposed views of them—you can also find yourself wondering: Does this mean that our democracy is vibrant, or that it is doomed?

They say in politics that where you stand depends on where you sit, and that may have something to do with how Bopp and Potter reached their respective conclusions.

The guides, which went out just before the election, were seen as important to the victories of Reagan and 12 new Republican senators. He sued to protect the guides, and won.

Bopp worked for Romney in and backs him this time. But his roots are outside the GOP establishment. During his first campaign, inhe recalled, the Republican Party occupied one such storefront, and two spontaneous citizens groups formed in two other storefronts Crazy Luck Casino No Deposit Bonus Codes also campaign for Goldwater, outside the formal party.

That would never happen today, he told me. Potter came to campaign finance five years after Bopp, via a presidential campaign. Bush assigned his firm the task of setting up the exploratory committee for his run.

Even though his guy won, Casino Political Action Committee Ap Government Textbook remained troubled. He wanted to fix it. The Federal Election Commission, whose very name seems calculated to induce indifference, was created by Congress to enforce the post-Watergate campaign-finance laws. Its six commissioners, who serve six-year terms, are supposed to work together without partisanship. But three commissioners come from each party, and they need a majority for any decision; they deadlock over anything that might disadvantage one side or the other.

The commission is, as a result, both an emblem and a cause of our great governmental dysfunction. After the Citizens United decision, the commissioners took almost two years to agree to issue a request for public comment on whether they should change campaign regulations that the Supreme Court had invalidated. But when several influential members of Congress complained about the new rules, Potter realized he would make no more headway with his colleagues.

With his FEC term ending, Potter took a sabbatical of sorts in the fall ofto teach at Oxford and research other electoral systems in hopes of finding a better Casino Political Action Committee Ap Government Textbook model.

This proved a more fruitless undertaking than trying to fix the FEC. Potter, who is not given to despair, decided to attack the problem from a new angle. They were hoping to rein in the practice perfected, if that is the word, by the Clinton campaign in of raising vast amounts of so-called soft money. This money, like the funds raised by super pac s today, could come in unlimited amounts. But the parties had to disclose the sources of their money, and in theory, they had to spend the donations to advance issues rather than to promote or attack candidates.

Potter had a message for the two senators: We need to get this right. Its upshot was to ban corporations and unions from paying for candidate-specific ads in the middle of a campaign. To protect the law before the Supreme Court, Potter advised the senators to set its foundation in Austin v. Michigan Chamber of Commercea case in which the Court had ruled that limits to politicking by corporations did not violate the First Amendment.

But Bopp finally got what he wanted: McCain-Feingold may have made history, but Citizens United went back and rewrote it. When I first spoke with Potter about Citizens Unitedlast November, Rivers Casino Margaritaville Players Club Sign Up was still trying to understand how the majority could have come to what he saw as such a wrongheaded decision.

None of the justices really understood the risks of corruption created by endless fund-raising and well-financed independent campaigns seeking specific legislation, and so they failed to defer to Congress, which knew the dangers firsthand. To Bopp, any attempts by sitting politicians to restrict money in politics are inherently suspect. Slender, silver-haired, and genial, Bopp usually comes across as what he might have been—the third in a generational line of doctors in Terre Haute. While candidates care obsessively about their own elections, a political party has broader interests.

This summer, the Court summarily reversed a case that would have given it the chance to revisit Citizens United by examining the corrupting effects, in the real world, of so-called independent expenditures. There is nothing inherently evil about money in politics. It was at a prospecting event for political money among Los Angeles elites last year that Joe Biden met the children of a gay couple and had his epiphany that gay marriage was not evil. Whatever you think of gay marriage, that encounter at least prompted the White House to end its ducking and weaving on a big question and take a stand.

Yet if political money is not wicked in principle, it has often proved troublesome in practice, with the trouble growing in proportion to the cost of campaigning and the need for more money—and also in proportion to public cynicism about politics. The booming new concerns of the Industrial Revolution—oil, steel, rail, finance—began pouring money into campaigns, in pursuit of specific policies, particularly protectionist tariffs. Hanna spent Bryan into the ground. Down through the decades, the rising political power of other groups, like unions, prompted new restrictions.

In all, 31 executives from companies like ITT and American Airlines were charged with giving money for government benefits, and Congress in enacted a new, extremely rigid campaign-finance regime: Two years later, in the landmark case Buckley v.

Valeothe Supreme Court struck down the spending limits, saying they undermined free speech. Corruption, of course, can occur across a wide spectrum, and it can appear to occur across an even wider one. Since Watergate, there have been a handful of egregious instances, like the Indian-casinos scandal of the last decade, in which the lobbyist Jack Abramoff supplied campaign money, along with bribes in the form of skybox seats and a golfing trip to Scotland, in exchange for legislative support for his clients.

But such clear cases are at the extreme. Or like the spectacle of President Clinton insisting that he did not rent the Lincoln Bedroom to Democratic Party donors and that, in his last hours in office, he did not pardon the financier Marc Rich in exchange for money for the Democrats.

This is all fairly tawdry, but is it corrupt? As a member of the White House press corps, I once joined in the contest as Bill Clinton spent 51 minutes, one hand casually tucked in a pants pocket, parrying questions about his fund-raising. It was an artful dodge—a deft flick of the adverbial cape over the charging bull—and, I suspect, it was the simple truth.

This is a legalized-bribery kind of system where no one has to say anything. What subsidies are left in place? What bill inconvenient to some interest languishes and then dies a quiet death?

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This is an old Washington game. Such political games take a toll on the citizenry.

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  1. In this video, I explain what political action committees are, and their impact on democracy. AP Gov Review Missing: casino.:
    campaign in which a group get its membership to contact government officials in support of the group's position. Political Action Committee (PAC). a private group that raises and distributes funds for use in election campaigns. Business interest groups. U.S. Chamber of Commerce, National Association of casinopokies.reviewg: casino. Countless pressing matters compete for the attention of lawmakers, therefore a strong political action committee (PAC) is necessary to support AGA's congressional To learn more about the AGA PAC, contact Grace Bennett, government relations and PAC coordinator. AGA's Get to Know Gaming, By the Book and More. New Jersey Gov. and Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie appears to be Wynn's only beneficiary of this election cycle, so far. This year, Wynn donated $5, to Christie's political action committee Leadership Matters for America and later $25, to super-PAC America Leads, which is.
  2. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on campaign on the day of the Nevada Republican caucuses (all times are Eastern Standard Time): a.m. Conservative Solutions PAC, a super political action committee run by his close allies, is planning for about $ million in television ads in eight of the :
    Yet when Newt Gingrich closed out his campaign, he thanked one couple—the casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and his wife—for “single-handedly” keeping him competitive with Mitt Romney's super pac, as if this was a noble rather than humiliating distinction for a presidential aspirant with a theoretically national network. Oil ($ million) According to the Project on Government Oversight, oil companies owe the U.S. an estimated $2 billion in royalties on oil taken from public land. He asked Fitzgerald to sign a consent form authorizing Outback to regularly deduct money from his paycheck for the company's political action committee. A pro-casino political action committee hired the same consulting firm that helped convince United Kingdom voters to leave the European Union. The anti-casino effort was largely funded by the Oxford Casino, which could see some business siphoned away by a new casino. Also on the statewide ballot.
  3. Casino baron Sheldon Adelson apparently prefers politics, not chance. The Washington Post revealed that Adelson gave $20 million to a political action committee with close ties to the Republican leadership, including Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. The day after this generosity became.:
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The Republican presidential candidate says in Nevada that next week's Super Tuesday primaries, including the balloting in Texas, "will be the most important night of this campaign. With returns still coming in, Cruz and rival Marco Rubio were locked in a tight race for second place. Supporter Glenn Beck introduced Cruz and said he's "totally fine with him being in third place, because Super Tuesday is coming. Cruz insisted that he's the only Republican candidate who can beat Nevada caucus winner Donald Trump.

He says, "the undeniable reality that the first four states have shown is that the only campaign that has beaten Donald Trump and the only campaign that can beat Donald Trump is this campaign. Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump is basking in his Nevada caucus victory by vowing to keep the open the military detention center in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Trump tells supporters gathered at the Treasure Island hotel in Las Vegas that he'll keep open the facility that President Obama is working to close. He says, "We're going to load it up with a lot of bad dudes out there. Trump also drew loud cheers for his vow to build a wall along the southern border and his instance that Mexico will pay for it. Trump offered shout-outs from the stage to several of his billionaire friends, including Phil Ruffin, who owns the Treasure Island, and casino developer Steve Wynn.

Donald Trump is celebrating his win in the Nevada Republican caucuses with a prediction that he'll soon claim the GOP presidential nomination. The billionaire businessman tells supporters in Las Vegas that, "it's going to be an amazing two months. Trump has won three contests in a row after finishing second in the leadoff Iowa caucuses.

He's in a strong position headed into next week's Super Tuesday contests, where voters in a dozen states will cast ballots in presidential primaries. Nevada caucus-goers who decided who to support before the last week were key to Donald Trump's victory in the state, according to early results of the entrance poll conducted among people arriving at their caucus sites.

Among those who decided who to support in the last week, about 4 in 10 supported Marco Rubio. About a quarter supported Trump and about 2 in 10 supported Ted Cruz.

But a majority of those deciding before the last week supported Trump, and they accounted for about 7 in 10 caucus attendees. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as Republican voters arrived at 25 randomly selected caucus sites in Nevada.

The preliminary results include interviews with 1, Republican caucus-goers and have a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. About 3 in 10 Nevada caucus attendees said the quality that mattered most to them in choosing a candidate is that he shares their values, according to preliminary results of the entrance poll.

That's slightly more said they want a candidate who can win in November or who can bring change, each chosen by about a quarter of caucus attendees. About 2 in 10 want one who "tells it like it is. Caucus winner Donald Trump was supported by nearly 9 in 10 of those caring most about having a candidate who "tells it like it is" and about 6 in 10 who wanted a candidate who can bring change.

Rubio was the favorite among those who cared most about electability, and Cruz among those wanting someone who shares their values. A crowd of several hundred supporters gathered at Donald Trump's Nevada watch party at the Treasure Island hotel in Las Vegas burst into cheers and screams the billionaire businessman won the state's caucuses.

Many of the supporters in the crowd are from out-of-state and decided to drop by the celebration while in town. Nevada caucuses winner Donald Trump was supported by 7 in 10 of those who preferred an outsider, according to early results of the entrance poll conducted for the Associated Press and television networks.

Nevada caucus attendees were more likely than primary or caucus attendees in any state so far to prefer an outsider candidate, the preliminary results show. Marco Rubio was supported by a majority of Nevada caucus-goers who wanted to support a candidate with political experience over a political outsider. That's a silver lining for Rubio. Nevada is the first state where any candidate earned majority support among those wanting a candidate with political experience over an outsider.

Donald Trump has won the Republican presidential caucuses in Nevada, giving the billionaire businessman three straight wins in the race for the GOP nomination. Preliminary entrance polls taken of Republican caucus-goers show that nearly 6 in 10 are angry at the way the government is working, and about half of them supported the billionaire businessman. Trump was also supported by about 6 in 10 of those who said they care most about immigration, and nearly half of those who said they care most about the economy.

The race for the Republican nomination now moves on to next week's Super Tuesday, when a dozen states will hold presidential primaries. Among early arrivals at Nevada's Republican caucuses, nearly 6 in 10 say they are angry at the way the government is working.

Entrance polls conducted as people arrived at caucus locations in Nevada show another third saying they are dissatisfied with the government. Those early arrivals are most likely to say the top issues facing the country are the economy or government spending, each listed by about 3 in 10 caucus. Immigration and terrorism were each chosen by slightly fewer — about 2 in The survey was being conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as Republican voters arrive at 25 randomly selected caucus sites in Nevada.

The preliminary results include interviews with Republican caucus-goers and have a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points. Cheering supporters and packs of selfie-seekers greeted Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump when he stopped by a Las Vegas caucus site Tuesday night.

Trump spent nearly an hour at Palo Verde High School. He was nearly mobbed by the crowd that had gathered to vote in the GOP caucuses. He drew more cheers when he asked, "Did you vote for Trump? The billionaire businessman ran through a list of campaign promises, including taking case of veterans and scrapping the president's health care law. He then posed for photos and greeted people who had lined up to meet him after they'd cast their ballots.

The same caucus site was reported to be having problems with double voting, long lines and not enough ballots. National party officials say they are looking into those reports, but state party officials say there are no official reports of voting irregularities or violations.

As Nevada Republicans caucus across the state, the Republican National Committee says it is concerned about reports of double voting at a troubled caucus site in Las Vegas. Some people were being turned away and directed to another location. Brown says the double-voting problem appears to be limited to one part of a caucus site where different precincts have been combined. The party plans to compare the number of paper ballots cast to the sign-in sheet to determine whether any double voting actually occurred.

The Florida senator spoke Tuesday night during a rally at a western Michigan auto supplier, two weeks before the state's primary. Rubio says Republicans must win the presidency and the GOP race "cannot be about just making a point. Rubio says he would rebuild a "gutted" U.

Rubio has framed the election as a "generational choice" and told his Michigan audience that it's time for "our generation to rise up and do our part. In in Columbia, South Carolina, for a forum hosted by CNN, Clinton says the prison is a "continuing recruitment advertisement for terrorists" and that Obama is right to try to close it. Obama's plan leaves unanswered the politically thorny question of where in the U. S a new facility would be located to house some of the most dangerous inmates.

Clinton says that should be a "matter of negotiation" with Republicans, who she hopes will join the effort to shutter the facility. Clinton is also reiterating her pledge to release transcripts of paid speeches to Wall Street banks only if every other presidential candidate does the same. Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is largely standing by his critique of the CIA as a "dangerous institution" used to "prop up fascist dictatorships.

Sanders pointed first to Iran's Mohammad Mossadeq, a democratically elected prime minister who was overthrown in , with CIA documents later confirming the agency's role.

Sanders says, "That led to the Iranian Revolution, and we are where we are today. He named the overthrow of Salvadore Allende in Chile, referring to a democratically elected communist who was ousted in a coup by hard-right dictator Augusto Pinochet.

Sanders said Allende had won an election and the CIA overthrew him. Trump sent a letter to the state Republican Party complaining that an unnamed Cruz backer was quoted in The Wall Street Journal advising caucus-goers to bring their cell phones and videotape the proceedings Tuesday evening. Past Nevada Republican caucuses have been roiled by allegations of improper behavior. Nevada Republicans responded by confirming that it is against party rules to record the caucus proceedings.

Members of the Culinary Union are planning to protest in front of Trump Hotel Las Vegas while Nevada voters weigh in on the resort's polarizing namesake. Culinary Union, the casino workers union, is staging a rally from 4 p. Tuesday, at the same time as Nevada's Republican caucus. Donald Trump is expected to do well in the contest.

The union wants to represent the hotel's workers, but the hotel is objecting to a recent union vote. Culinary officials say the hotel's management wants to draw the matter out in a lengthy legal battle, and point out that Trump made a deal with his employees in Canada. Republican Ted Cruz says he's facing the same sort of opposition from the Washington establishment that tried to take Ronald Reagan out before he unseated Jimmy Carter.

Paul Laxalt, one of Reagan's best friends. Laxalt introduced Cruz to a crowd of about at an outdoor park in rural Minden during the second of four campaign stops hours before Republicans start to cast their votes. Cruz said Republicans are asking the same questions about him that they asked of Reagan back then: Is he too conservative? Cruz said the "Reagan Revolution" didn't come from Washington, which he said "despised Reagan. But indirectly, by making it illegal for banks to process receipts derived from online gaming.

Which is not unlike Henry Ford saying customers could have any color Model T they liked… so long as it's black. Only, worse — because Henry Ford couldn't prevent customers from going across the street and buying a blue or yellow Chevy. It is certainly understandable that Adelson is miffed by the rise of lower-cost gaming options that — as he sees it — takes away from his bottom line.

This is the reflex action of established players dealing with changing times. Hard copy publishers — and bricks and mortar book stores — are not happy about Kindle readers and Amazon. But so far they haven't funneled millions to political action committees in order to make Kindle readers illegal, or tried to thwart Amazon. At least they'd have an intelligible argument - that gambling is a dangerous vice that ought to suppressed. They are targeting some gambling.

The gambling that Adelson doesn't control — and which doesn't make him money. Ironically — and unlike the bricks-and-mortar bookstore example above — online gambling is less a threat to Adelson's well-padded pocketbook than he seems to think it is.

His Vegas operations are destinations. People pay top dollar to stay at the Sands and Venetian - and usually stay awhile. An online gamer might spend 15 minutes on the computer and be done. He's not paying for drinks and meals or lodging.

Adelson's operations offer more than just gambling — and they are making plenty of money. Maybe not enough for Adelson — but that ought not to be the basis for corrupting the legislative process for his sake.

The recent presidential election sent a message that the public is tired of insider deals, crony capitalism and government of, by and for the politically connected. Senate Republicans especially ought to take this lesson to heart.

able take

Senate Republicans especially ought to take this lesson to heart. If they make the mistake of carrying water for the likes of Sheldon Adelson, the next election's results may be a lot less favorable than last week's.

Eric Peters is an automotive journalist and author. Thinking of submitting an op-ed to the Washington Examiner? Gambling ought to be just that — a game of chance. He wants it all. By ending all competition. Which he intends to do not by out-competing his rivals but by outlawing them. For which he needs politicians. He certainly paid enough to deserve some credit for this proposed legislation. Why should online gaming be targeted?

Adelson claims it's "for the children," but this is risible given how Adelson earns his living. Trump also drew loud cheers for his vow to build a wall along the southern border and his instance that Mexico will pay for it. Trump offered shout-outs from the stage to several of his billionaire friends, including Phil Ruffin, who owns the Treasure Island, and casino developer Steve Wynn.

Donald Trump is celebrating his win in the Nevada Republican caucuses with a prediction that he'll soon claim the GOP presidential nomination. The billionaire businessman tells supporters in Las Vegas that, "it's going to be an amazing two months. Trump has won three contests in a row after finishing second in the leadoff Iowa caucuses. He's in a strong position headed into next week's Super Tuesday contests, where voters in a dozen states will cast ballots in presidential primaries.

Nevada caucus-goers who decided who to support before the last week were key to Donald Trump's victory in the state, according to early results of the entrance poll conducted among people arriving at their caucus sites. Among those who decided who to support in the last week, about 4 in 10 supported Marco Rubio. About a quarter supported Trump and about 2 in 10 supported Ted Cruz.

But a majority of those deciding before the last week supported Trump, and they accounted for about 7 in 10 caucus attendees. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as Republican voters arrived at 25 randomly selected caucus sites in Nevada. The preliminary results include interviews with 1, Republican caucus-goers and have a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

About 3 in 10 Nevada caucus attendees said the quality that mattered most to them in choosing a candidate is that he shares their values, according to preliminary results of the entrance poll. That's slightly more said they want a candidate who can win in November or who can bring change, each chosen by about a quarter of caucus attendees. About 2 in 10 want one who "tells it like it is. Caucus winner Donald Trump was supported by nearly 9 in 10 of those caring most about having a candidate who "tells it like it is" and about 6 in 10 who wanted a candidate who can bring change.

Rubio was the favorite among those who cared most about electability, and Cruz among those wanting someone who shares their values. A crowd of several hundred supporters gathered at Donald Trump's Nevada watch party at the Treasure Island hotel in Las Vegas burst into cheers and screams the billionaire businessman won the state's caucuses.

Many of the supporters in the crowd are from out-of-state and decided to drop by the celebration while in town. Nevada caucuses winner Donald Trump was supported by 7 in 10 of those who preferred an outsider, according to early results of the entrance poll conducted for the Associated Press and television networks.

Nevada caucus attendees were more likely than primary or caucus attendees in any state so far to prefer an outsider candidate, the preliminary results show. Marco Rubio was supported by a majority of Nevada caucus-goers who wanted to support a candidate with political experience over a political outsider. That's a silver lining for Rubio. Nevada is the first state where any candidate earned majority support among those wanting a candidate with political experience over an outsider.

Donald Trump has won the Republican presidential caucuses in Nevada, giving the billionaire businessman three straight wins in the race for the GOP nomination. Preliminary entrance polls taken of Republican caucus-goers show that nearly 6 in 10 are angry at the way the government is working, and about half of them supported the billionaire businessman.

Trump was also supported by about 6 in 10 of those who said they care most about immigration, and nearly half of those who said they care most about the economy. The race for the Republican nomination now moves on to next week's Super Tuesday, when a dozen states will hold presidential primaries. Among early arrivals at Nevada's Republican caucuses, nearly 6 in 10 say they are angry at the way the government is working.

Entrance polls conducted as people arrived at caucus locations in Nevada show another third saying they are dissatisfied with the government. Those early arrivals are most likely to say the top issues facing the country are the economy or government spending, each listed by about 3 in 10 caucus.

Immigration and terrorism were each chosen by slightly fewer — about 2 in The survey was being conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research as Republican voters arrive at 25 randomly selected caucus sites in Nevada. The preliminary results include interviews with Republican caucus-goers and have a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

Cheering supporters and packs of selfie-seekers greeted Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump when he stopped by a Las Vegas caucus site Tuesday night. Trump spent nearly an hour at Palo Verde High School. He was nearly mobbed by the crowd that had gathered to vote in the GOP caucuses. He drew more cheers when he asked, "Did you vote for Trump? The billionaire businessman ran through a list of campaign promises, including taking case of veterans and scrapping the president's health care law.

He then posed for photos and greeted people who had lined up to meet him after they'd cast their ballots. The same caucus site was reported to be having problems with double voting, long lines and not enough ballots. National party officials say they are looking into those reports, but state party officials say there are no official reports of voting irregularities or violations. As Nevada Republicans caucus across the state, the Republican National Committee says it is concerned about reports of double voting at a troubled caucus site in Las Vegas.

Some people were being turned away and directed to another location. Brown says the double-voting problem appears to be limited to one part of a caucus site where different precincts have been combined. The party plans to compare the number of paper ballots cast to the sign-in sheet to determine whether any double voting actually occurred. The Florida senator spoke Tuesday night during a rally at a western Michigan auto supplier, two weeks before the state's primary.

Rubio says Republicans must win the presidency and the GOP race "cannot be about just making a point. Rubio says he would rebuild a "gutted" U.

Rubio has framed the election as a "generational choice" and told his Michigan audience that it's time for "our generation to rise up and do our part. In in Columbia, South Carolina, for a forum hosted by CNN, Clinton says the prison is a "continuing recruitment advertisement for terrorists" and that Obama is right to try to close it.

Obama's plan leaves unanswered the politically thorny question of where in the U. S a new facility would be located to house some of the most dangerous inmates. Clinton says that should be a "matter of negotiation" with Republicans, who she hopes will join the effort to shutter the facility. Clinton is also reiterating her pledge to release transcripts of paid speeches to Wall Street banks only if every other presidential candidate does the same.

This proved a more fruitless undertaking than trying to fix the FEC. Potter, who is not given to despair, decided to attack the problem from a new angle. They were hoping to rein in the practice perfected, if that is the word, by the Clinton campaign in of raising vast amounts of so-called soft money.

This money, like the funds raised by super pac s today, could come in unlimited amounts. But the parties had to disclose the sources of their money, and in theory, they had to spend the donations to advance issues rather than to promote or attack candidates.

Potter had a message for the two senators: We need to get this right. Its upshot was to ban corporations and unions from paying for candidate-specific ads in the middle of a campaign. To protect the law before the Supreme Court, Potter advised the senators to set its foundation in Austin v.

Michigan Chamber of Commerce , a case in which the Court had ruled that limits to politicking by corporations did not violate the First Amendment. But Bopp finally got what he wanted: McCain-Feingold may have made history, but Citizens United went back and rewrote it.

When I first spoke with Potter about Citizens United , last November, he was still trying to understand how the majority could have come to what he saw as such a wrongheaded decision. None of the justices really understood the risks of corruption created by endless fund-raising and well-financed independent campaigns seeking specific legislation, and so they failed to defer to Congress, which knew the dangers firsthand.

To Bopp, any attempts by sitting politicians to restrict money in politics are inherently suspect. Slender, silver-haired, and genial, Bopp usually comes across as what he might have been—the third in a generational line of doctors in Terre Haute. While candidates care obsessively about their own elections, a political party has broader interests. This summer, the Court summarily reversed a case that would have given it the chance to revisit Citizens United by examining the corrupting effects, in the real world, of so-called independent expenditures.

There is nothing inherently evil about money in politics. It was at a prospecting event for political money among Los Angeles elites last year that Joe Biden met the children of a gay couple and had his epiphany that gay marriage was not evil. Whatever you think of gay marriage, that encounter at least prompted the White House to end its ducking and weaving on a big question and take a stand.

Yet if political money is not wicked in principle, it has often proved troublesome in practice, with the trouble growing in proportion to the cost of campaigning and the need for more money—and also in proportion to public cynicism about politics.

The booming new concerns of the Industrial Revolution—oil, steel, rail, finance—began pouring money into campaigns, in pursuit of specific policies, particularly protectionist tariffs. Hanna spent Bryan into the ground. Down through the decades, the rising political power of other groups, like unions, prompted new restrictions. In all, 31 executives from companies like ITT and American Airlines were charged with giving money for government benefits, and Congress in enacted a new, extremely rigid campaign-finance regime: Two years later, in the landmark case Buckley v.

Valeo , the Supreme Court struck down the spending limits, saying they undermined free speech. Corruption, of course, can occur across a wide spectrum, and it can appear to occur across an even wider one. Since Watergate, there have been a handful of egregious instances, like the Indian-casinos scandal of the last decade, in which the lobbyist Jack Abramoff supplied campaign money, along with bribes in the form of skybox seats and a golfing trip to Scotland, in exchange for legislative support for his clients.

But such clear cases are at the extreme. Or like the spectacle of President Clinton insisting that he did not rent the Lincoln Bedroom to Democratic Party donors and that, in his last hours in office, he did not pardon the financier Marc Rich in exchange for money for the Democrats.

This is all fairly tawdry, but is it corrupt? As a member of the White House press corps, I once joined in the contest as Bill Clinton spent 51 minutes, one hand casually tucked in a pants pocket, parrying questions about his fund-raising.

It was an artful dodge—a deft flick of the adverbial cape over the charging bull—and, I suspect, it was the simple truth. This is a legalized-bribery kind of system where no one has to say anything. What subsidies are left in place? What bill inconvenient to some interest languishes and then dies a quiet death?

This is an old Washington game. Such political games take a toll on the citizenry. Indeed, voters have good cause to wonder which branch of government is taking their views of politics into account. Citizens United itself appears not to have helped matters.

He sees it as a reflection of healthy skepticism of politics in general. Super pac s have proved useful to candidates not just as vehicles to raise unlimited contributions, but as allies that create particularly nasty ads that the beneficiary can distance himself from.

It is also hard to imagine why the donors who are now choosing not to reveal themselves would suddenly want to step into the light of day. The growing river of anonymous money is a result of the brokenness of our political system; no branch of government made an affirmative decision to let this money in.

In Citizens United , eight justices favored disclosure Clarence Thomas was the exception. No less a conservative light than Antonin Scalia, in a case, declared:. Requiring people to stand up in public for their political acts fosters civic courage, without which democracy is doomed. This does not resemble the Home of the Brave. Bopp had an answer ready when I asked him about the Scalia quotation: His point is more nuanced. I advanced the argument that voters should know the interests of anyone advocating a political position, because otherwise they might be deceived.

Who are they to decide this for Joe Blow out here? Well, it so happens that my brother, Michael, is a senator from Colorado. In the inaugural cycle for super pac s, in , Michael was the top target, and conservative super pac s outspent liberal ones in his race that year nearly 3-to His image was distorted, the voice-overs were ominous, and all in all, the ads made him seem like a devil. To me, all this advertising seemed less like the currency of democracy than like a grotesquely stupid exercise to enrich political consultants and local television stations, and to drive voters away from polls.

It seems like a fair question—but one that might get asked only if my name is on the story; once the reader has that information, the rest is just a Google search away, with no government intervention necessary. Even after Potter started the gig, it took him a while to fully appreciate the joke: The whole point, he explained, was to work through the legal questions on television. In one segment, a despondent Colbert made a show of shredding the paperwork for his PAC after Viacom objected that it could get in trouble for making a contribution in the form of airtime to a political-action committee.

In reality, of course, close allies and recent aides of the candidates run the super pac s. The Federal Election Commission could enforce more independence. The segment in which Colbert created his super pac also underscored a profound legal—maybe even philosophical—shift wrought by Citizens United.

Indeed, the Court in Citizens United glided past some big questions, including, for example, whether a globe-spanning company, such as an oil company, has the same right as an American company to spend unlimited sums on American elections as Justice John Paul Stevens acidly observed in his dissent: There is plenty of precedent for regulating certain types of speech by corporations: The Court has drawn a distinction, however, between commercial and political speech.

For the latter, the First Amendment protection is now all but absolute. But can a corporation engage in political speech that is not commercial? Jim Bopp finds the question a bit silly. As a political matter, opening the door wide to corporate money has merely erased Democratic advantages in union ground support and media sympathy, in his view.

And as a matter of law and common sense, he sees corporations as people, not reducible to a single interest. It is not only maximizing profits. It is advancing the economic interest of the corporation, in many different ways.

To Potter, the focus even on a broader economic interest sets a corporation apart from a citizen.

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If they make the mistake of carrying water for the likes of Sheldon Adelson, the next election's results may be a lot less favorable than last week's. Eric Peters is an automotive journalist and author. Thinking of submitting an op-ed to the Washington Examiner? Gambling ought to be just that — a game of chance. He wants it all. By ending all competition. Which he intends to do not by out-competing his rivals but by outlawing them. For which he needs politicians.

He certainly paid enough to deserve some credit for this proposed legislation. Why should online gaming be targeted? Adelson claims it's "for the children," but this is risible given how Adelson earns his living.

But they aren't targeting gambling. The preliminary results include interviews with Republican caucus-goers and have a margin of error of plus or minus 5 percentage points. Cheering supporters and packs of selfie-seekers greeted Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump when he stopped by a Las Vegas caucus site Tuesday night.

Trump spent nearly an hour at Palo Verde High School. He was nearly mobbed by the crowd that had gathered to vote in the GOP caucuses. He drew more cheers when he asked, "Did you vote for Trump? The billionaire businessman ran through a list of campaign promises, including taking case of veterans and scrapping the president's health care law. He then posed for photos and greeted people who had lined up to meet him after they'd cast their ballots.

The same caucus site was reported to be having problems with double voting, long lines and not enough ballots. National party officials say they are looking into those reports, but state party officials say there are no official reports of voting irregularities or violations. As Nevada Republicans caucus across the state, the Republican National Committee says it is concerned about reports of double voting at a troubled caucus site in Las Vegas. Some people were being turned away and directed to another location.

Brown says the double-voting problem appears to be limited to one part of a caucus site where different precincts have been combined. The party plans to compare the number of paper ballots cast to the sign-in sheet to determine whether any double voting actually occurred. The Florida senator spoke Tuesday night during a rally at a western Michigan auto supplier, two weeks before the state's primary. Rubio says Republicans must win the presidency and the GOP race "cannot be about just making a point.

Rubio says he would rebuild a "gutted" U. Rubio has framed the election as a "generational choice" and told his Michigan audience that it's time for "our generation to rise up and do our part.

In in Columbia, South Carolina, for a forum hosted by CNN, Clinton says the prison is a "continuing recruitment advertisement for terrorists" and that Obama is right to try to close it.

Obama's plan leaves unanswered the politically thorny question of where in the U. S a new facility would be located to house some of the most dangerous inmates. Clinton says that should be a "matter of negotiation" with Republicans, who she hopes will join the effort to shutter the facility. Clinton is also reiterating her pledge to release transcripts of paid speeches to Wall Street banks only if every other presidential candidate does the same.

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is largely standing by his critique of the CIA as a "dangerous institution" used to "prop up fascist dictatorships. Sanders pointed first to Iran's Mohammad Mossadeq, a democratically elected prime minister who was overthrown in , with CIA documents later confirming the agency's role.

Sanders says, "That led to the Iranian Revolution, and we are where we are today. He named the overthrow of Salvadore Allende in Chile, referring to a democratically elected communist who was ousted in a coup by hard-right dictator Augusto Pinochet. Sanders said Allende had won an election and the CIA overthrew him. Trump sent a letter to the state Republican Party complaining that an unnamed Cruz backer was quoted in The Wall Street Journal advising caucus-goers to bring their cell phones and videotape the proceedings Tuesday evening.

Past Nevada Republican caucuses have been roiled by allegations of improper behavior. Nevada Republicans responded by confirming that it is against party rules to record the caucus proceedings.

Members of the Culinary Union are planning to protest in front of Trump Hotel Las Vegas while Nevada voters weigh in on the resort's polarizing namesake. Culinary Union, the casino workers union, is staging a rally from 4 p. Tuesday, at the same time as Nevada's Republican caucus. Donald Trump is expected to do well in the contest.

The union wants to represent the hotel's workers, but the hotel is objecting to a recent union vote. Culinary officials say the hotel's management wants to draw the matter out in a lengthy legal battle, and point out that Trump made a deal with his employees in Canada.

Republican Ted Cruz says he's facing the same sort of opposition from the Washington establishment that tried to take Ronald Reagan out before he unseated Jimmy Carter.

Paul Laxalt, one of Reagan's best friends. Laxalt introduced Cruz to a crowd of about at an outdoor park in rural Minden during the second of four campaign stops hours before Republicans start to cast their votes. Cruz said Republicans are asking the same questions about him that they asked of Reagan back then: Is he too conservative? Cruz said the "Reagan Revolution" didn't come from Washington, which he said "despised Reagan. Marco Rubio says the Republican race for the presidential nomination can't be about "making a point" by picking a political outsider.

But he urged voters to look past candidates who exude anger or a willingness to say outlandish things. Rubio is riding a wave of recent high-profile endorsements but is still trying to score a win as candidates shift their focus to later-voting states. His stop in Minnesota came as Nevada Republicans prepared to caucus and a week before the Midwestern state's own caucus on Super Tuesday. Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump is floating the idea of turning the detention center at Guantanamo Bay over to Cuba.

Trump was delivering a rally speech in Sparks, Nevada Tuesday when he addressed President Barack Obama's speech earlier in the day outlining his plan to close the detention center. The detention center is located on the U. Naval base at Guantanamo Bay, which the U. It says the termination of the lease requires the consent of both the U. CNN says it will no longer book Donald Trump supporter Roger Stone as a guest on the network, after he tweeted profane remarks about one of the network's political commentators.

The liberal media watchdog Media Matters for America, which has followed Stone's tweets, said the political consultant and author has appeared on CNN seven times within the past month. Donald Trump warned his Nevada supporters to keep an eye out for what he described as "dishonest stuff" at their caucus sites tonight and report it to Trump volunteers or to police.

You've just got to be careful. None of the justices really understood the risks of corruption created by endless fund-raising and well-financed independent campaigns seeking specific legislation, and so they failed to defer to Congress, which knew the dangers firsthand. To Bopp, any attempts by sitting politicians to restrict money in politics are inherently suspect.

Slender, silver-haired, and genial, Bopp usually comes across as what he might have been—the third in a generational line of doctors in Terre Haute. While candidates care obsessively about their own elections, a political party has broader interests. This summer, the Court summarily reversed a case that would have given it the chance to revisit Citizens United by examining the corrupting effects, in the real world, of so-called independent expenditures.

There is nothing inherently evil about money in politics. It was at a prospecting event for political money among Los Angeles elites last year that Joe Biden met the children of a gay couple and had his epiphany that gay marriage was not evil.

Whatever you think of gay marriage, that encounter at least prompted the White House to end its ducking and weaving on a big question and take a stand.

Yet if political money is not wicked in principle, it has often proved troublesome in practice, with the trouble growing in proportion to the cost of campaigning and the need for more money—and also in proportion to public cynicism about politics. The booming new concerns of the Industrial Revolution—oil, steel, rail, finance—began pouring money into campaigns, in pursuit of specific policies, particularly protectionist tariffs. Hanna spent Bryan into the ground.

Down through the decades, the rising political power of other groups, like unions, prompted new restrictions. In all, 31 executives from companies like ITT and American Airlines were charged with giving money for government benefits, and Congress in enacted a new, extremely rigid campaign-finance regime: Two years later, in the landmark case Buckley v.

Valeo , the Supreme Court struck down the spending limits, saying they undermined free speech. Corruption, of course, can occur across a wide spectrum, and it can appear to occur across an even wider one. Since Watergate, there have been a handful of egregious instances, like the Indian-casinos scandal of the last decade, in which the lobbyist Jack Abramoff supplied campaign money, along with bribes in the form of skybox seats and a golfing trip to Scotland, in exchange for legislative support for his clients.

But such clear cases are at the extreme. Or like the spectacle of President Clinton insisting that he did not rent the Lincoln Bedroom to Democratic Party donors and that, in his last hours in office, he did not pardon the financier Marc Rich in exchange for money for the Democrats. This is all fairly tawdry, but is it corrupt? As a member of the White House press corps, I once joined in the contest as Bill Clinton spent 51 minutes, one hand casually tucked in a pants pocket, parrying questions about his fund-raising.

It was an artful dodge—a deft flick of the adverbial cape over the charging bull—and, I suspect, it was the simple truth. This is a legalized-bribery kind of system where no one has to say anything. What subsidies are left in place? What bill inconvenient to some interest languishes and then dies a quiet death? This is an old Washington game. Such political games take a toll on the citizenry. Indeed, voters have good cause to wonder which branch of government is taking their views of politics into account.

Citizens United itself appears not to have helped matters. He sees it as a reflection of healthy skepticism of politics in general. Super pac s have proved useful to candidates not just as vehicles to raise unlimited contributions, but as allies that create particularly nasty ads that the beneficiary can distance himself from.

It is also hard to imagine why the donors who are now choosing not to reveal themselves would suddenly want to step into the light of day. The growing river of anonymous money is a result of the brokenness of our political system; no branch of government made an affirmative decision to let this money in.

In Citizens United , eight justices favored disclosure Clarence Thomas was the exception. No less a conservative light than Antonin Scalia, in a case, declared:. Requiring people to stand up in public for their political acts fosters civic courage, without which democracy is doomed.

This does not resemble the Home of the Brave. Bopp had an answer ready when I asked him about the Scalia quotation: His point is more nuanced. I advanced the argument that voters should know the interests of anyone advocating a political position, because otherwise they might be deceived. Who are they to decide this for Joe Blow out here? Well, it so happens that my brother, Michael, is a senator from Colorado. In the inaugural cycle for super pac s, in , Michael was the top target, and conservative super pac s outspent liberal ones in his race that year nearly 3-to His image was distorted, the voice-overs were ominous, and all in all, the ads made him seem like a devil.

To me, all this advertising seemed less like the currency of democracy than like a grotesquely stupid exercise to enrich political consultants and local television stations, and to drive voters away from polls. It seems like a fair question—but one that might get asked only if my name is on the story; once the reader has that information, the rest is just a Google search away, with no government intervention necessary. Even after Potter started the gig, it took him a while to fully appreciate the joke: The whole point, he explained, was to work through the legal questions on television.

In one segment, a despondent Colbert made a show of shredding the paperwork for his PAC after Viacom objected that it could get in trouble for making a contribution in the form of airtime to a political-action committee. In reality, of course, close allies and recent aides of the candidates run the super pac s. The Federal Election Commission could enforce more independence. The segment in which Colbert created his super pac also underscored a profound legal—maybe even philosophical—shift wrought by Citizens United.

Indeed, the Court in Citizens United glided past some big questions, including, for example, whether a globe-spanning company, such as an oil company, has the same right as an American company to spend unlimited sums on American elections as Justice John Paul Stevens acidly observed in his dissent: There is plenty of precedent for regulating certain types of speech by corporations: The Court has drawn a distinction, however, between commercial and political speech.

For the latter, the First Amendment protection is now all but absolute. But can a corporation engage in political speech that is not commercial? Jim Bopp finds the question a bit silly. As a political matter, opening the door wide to corporate money has merely erased Democratic advantages in union ground support and media sympathy, in his view.

And as a matter of law and common sense, he sees corporations as people, not reducible to a single interest. It is not only maximizing profits. It is advancing the economic interest of the corporation, in many different ways. To Potter, the focus even on a broader economic interest sets a corporation apart from a citizen.

But citizens have a very different approach to politics. Is this decision affected by my religion? By my moral values? By whether I think war is morally wrong? By whether I think we should be safeguarding our future in the Far East? All these sorts of questions are at play when an individual makes a political decision of who to support. It is supposed to figure out how to get more out of the government, how to get a policy that benefits it at the expense of its competitors.

The majority in Citizens United implicitly endorsed a narrow, corporate approach to politics. In its hymn to the new era of disclosure, the majority noted: It is hard not to read that as: Jim Bopp has cases in the works to challenge the constitutionality of that restriction.

Reformers who have been around a long time are betting that an old political cycle will repeat itself—that a permissive era will produce a scandal that will produce new rules.

The history for me is the saving grace here, being old enough to have lived through this before.